Jerry Brown disappoints – laopinion.com

Governor Jerry Brown’s veto of the TRUST Act means political considerations triumphed over protecting California’s immigrant community from the arbitrary enforcement of federal law. The enactment of the state law would have probably led to a confrontation in court with the Justice Department, since it established state regulation of a federal program, Se Communities. The governor apparently did not understand that this was a fair battle, one worth fighting. From the beginning, the federal program-intended to detain and deport dangerous undocumented immigrants-was disorganized and confusing about aspects of its implementation and rules establishing the duties and responsibilities of cities, counties and states. The situation worsened when some law enforcement agencies interpreted the program strictly, contradicting the idea of focusing on the most dangerous individuals, and wasted time and resources on irrelevant cases.

Brown misses opportunity with TRUST Act

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new law that will allow hundreds of thousands of young illegal immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses and vetoed another that would have restricted sheriffs from helping federal authorities detain undocumented Californians for potential deportation. His actions, announced Sunday as the deadline neared to finish work on nearly 1,000 bills sent to him by the Legislature this year, followed an intense week of protests, prayer vigils and lobbying by immigrant advocacy groups. The governor also revived a tax break for Hollywood, allowed juvenile killers serving life in prison a chance for release and outlawed intended to turn gay children straight. The laws take effect Jan. 1. The immigration bills sparked the most controversy.

Calif. gov. OKs driver licenses for illegal immigrants, rejects ‘anti-Arizona’ legislation – The Washington Post

Meanwhile, Brown vetoed AB1081, which could have protected illegal immigrants from deportation if they committed minor infractions. The bill has been dubbed “anti-Arizona” legislation, a reference to that state’s immigrant identification law. The so-called Trust Act would have let California opt out of some parts of a federal program that requires local law enforcement officers to check the fingerprints of people they arrest against a federal immigration database and hold those who are in the country illegally. It would have barred local law enforcement officers from detaining suspects for possible deportation unless they are charged with serious or violent felonies.

TRUST Act Vetoed: California Gov. Jerry Brown Calls Limits On Immigration Enforcement ‘Flawed’

California Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a bill late Sunday to make California the “anti-Arizona” on immigration enforcement, after a long fight that took the bill into the national spotlight as a possible rebuke to a program the Obama administration has made key to its effort to remove undocumented immigrants. Brown did not announce his decision on the bill until close to midnight, Pacific time, as part of a spate of bills — including one he did sign to allow driver licenses for some young undocumented immigrants — that Brown needed to address before the end of September. Even a few hours before, advocates weren’t sure which way it would go, but in the end Brown ruled it “fatally flawed.” The TRUST Act, which was originally introduced by state Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, would have limited the state’s law enforcement’s interactions with federal immigration enforcement efforts. It specifically would have restricted California’s cooperation in the Se Communities program

Day Laborers Denounce Governor Brown’s Veto of TRUST Act, Pledge to Continue Fighting President’s Se Communities Mass Deportation Program

Los Angeles – September 29, 2012.In response to Governor Brown’s veto of the TRUST Act (AB 1081), Pablo Alvarado, executive director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network issued the following statement:   “By vetoing the TRUST Act Governor Brown has failed California’s immigrant communities, imperiling civil rights and leaving us all less safe. The President’s…

TRUST Act Endorsements

The Sacramento BeeEnd ICE’s hold on law enforcement agenciesApril 13, 2012By Julia Harumi Mass By giving officers an incentive to arrest “foreign-looking” individuals for minor infractions or no reason at all, S-Comm undermines the Constitution’s guarantees of due process and equal protection and encourages racial profiling. La OpinionCalifornia No Es Arizonapor Hector Villagra y Pablo…

Rally to Call on Gov. Brown to Protect Civil Rights of Californians and Expand Protections for Long-Excluded Workers


Domestic Workers, Day Laborers, and Supporters Urge Gov. Brown to Sign Two Landmark Bills into Law


Los Angeles – Hundreds of Californians from throughout the state will hold a major rally in Los Angeles September 29, 2012, urging Governor Jerry Brown to sign two measures that would expand basic protections to long-struggling workers and protect Californians from family-shattering deportations. Each proposal would create a national model for powerful, progressive policy.

It is a matter of leadership, vision, and state pride, say supporters of the two bills.  The California Domestic Worker Bill of Rights (AB 889 – Ammiano) would end the outdated exclusion of domestic workers from basic labor protections by extending rights such as overtime pay and meal and rest breaks to the caregivers, childcare providers, and housecleaners caring for California’s families and homes. The TRUST Act (AB 1081 – Ammiano) would bring relief to families who fear deportation as a result of the most trivial of arrests, and rebuild confidence in law enforcement. The bill prevents the costly detention of aspiring citizens in local jails for deportation purposes, only allowing immigration “holds” for those charged or convicted of a serious or violent felony. 

Ariz. immigrants taught to cope with new law – CBS News

Critics of Arizona’s controversial immigration law are on alert. This week, a federal judge gave the state the go-ahead to enforce the “show me your papers” provision of the law. Now some undocumented immigrants are being taught how to respond. As night falls on a Mesa, Arizona park, worried families, many of them undocumented immigrants, are instructed on what to say if questioned by police. Instructor: “You want a lawyer?” Woman: “Yes.” Civil rights groups are also teaching people how to use cell phones to record video if stopped by the police. The training session was a response to Arizona’s law that took effect this week. It allows police to investigate the immigration status of anyone they stop, giving rise to fears of racial profiling. Defenders of the law say police will not use race when deciding whom to question about immigration status.

Letter from ICE Director John Morton to Hate Group, FAIR, Stirs Controversy

Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s practices with local police are facing scrutiny this week as the injunction on the racial profiling provision of SB1070 was lifted and section 2b went into effect. ICE had previously rescinded Maricopa County’s 287(g) agreement–which enabled local sheriffs in Arpaio’s office to act as immigration officers–after the Department of Justice exposed…