Amherst passes law in opposition to Se Communities – WWLP.com

With a nearly unanimous vote at Monday’s town meeting, the Town of Amherst decided to opt out of the controversial Se Communities Program. Se Communities is a program designed by the Department of Homeland Security to crack down on illegal immigrants who commit crimes, as well as those who continually violate immigration laws. By passing Article 29, Amherst residents chose not to participate. Through the resolution, community members said that they wanted to make sure local law enforcement agencies could not stop anyone randomly just to check their immigration status. Amherst’s resolution specifically states, “Municipal employees of the Town of Amherst, including law enforcement employees, shall not monitor, stop, detain, question, interrogate or search a person for the purpose of determining that individual’s immigration status.”

California TRUST Act with Amendments

Existing federal law authorizes any authorized immigration officer to issue an immigration detainer that serves to advise another law enforcement agency that the federal department seeks custody of an alien presently in the custody of that agency, for the purpose of arresting and removing the alien. Existing federal law provides that the detainer is a request that the agency advise the department, prior to release of the alien, in order for the department to arrange to assume custody, in situations when gaining immediate physical custody is either impracticable or impossible.
This bill would prohibit a law enforcement official, as defined, from detaining an individual on the basis of a United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold after that individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody, unless the local agency adopts a plan that meets certain requirements prior to or after compliance with the immigration hold, and, at the time that the individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody, certain conditions are met.

‘TRUST Act 2.0′: Amended CA bill would only let cops hold convicted criminals for ICE | Multi-American

A year ago, order a bill was moving through the California state legislature that aimed to make optional counties and cities’ participation in the controversial Se Communities immigration enforcement program. At the time, California was one of several states in which some state and law enforcement officials had come out against the federal program, store which allows the fingerprints of people booked at local jails to be shared with immigration officials. The bill was rendered moot last August, after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement rescinded state agreements with the agency allowing Se Communities to operate. The decision essentially made the program mandatory, leaving states no choice but to go along. As a counter to that, the same California lawmaker behind last year’s bill is now pushing an alternative dubbed TRUST Act 2.0.

Vista, CA Father’s Death in AZ Desert Shows Need for TRUST Act

A Vista man died along the U.S. border with Mexico last month trying to return to his family after being deported. The body of Alfonso Martinez Sanchez, 39, was found on the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, his family and authorities said. The reservation stretches along the Arizona border and is a frequent route for thousands of migrants attempting to cross the border illegally. It is an unforgiving environment, part of the Sonoran desert, where temperatures can often soar to more than 100 degrees. Martinez was trying to return to his wife and five U.S.-born children, ages 5 to 18, said Juana Garcia Martinez, his wife. Martinez was the main bread winner and now the family is struggling to make ends meet, she said. “He knew that we needed him,” Garcia said. “He wanted to be here.”

Immigrants Lobby for TRUST Act in Sacramento

A morning rally is planned before the various groups fan out to talk with legislators. The rally, which will take place at the capitol building will include greetings and speeches from Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-SF and Sen. Kevin De Leon, D-LA. Dilkhwaz Ahmed traveled to Sacramento on Sunday to get a head start on the activities. She is executive director of El Cajon-based License to Freedom, which provides support services to refugee and immigrant survivors of domestic abuse. She is prepared to share client stories with decision makers who will consider AB 1081, a bill dubbed “TRUST Act,” which would allow communities to opt out of the federal immigration “Se Communities” program until county officials choose to rejoin under amended agreements that would provide protection for some immigrants including those who are victims of domestic violence. The program, currently in place in every country across the state, scans fingerprints to check for legal status and generally allows..

Obama’s broken immigration promise – Salon

The Obama administration claims that it is deporting record numbers of illegal immigrants while focusing on those with criminal records. But new data from Immigration and Customs Enforcement shows that the number of deportation orders has declined dramatically since last summer and non-criminals comprise a growing percentage of those expelled from the country. That wasn’t supposed to happen under a policy of “prosecutorial discretion” announced by ICE director John Morton last June. The goal of the policy, announced with much fanfare in the Spanish language media, ask was to spare “longtime lawful residents” from deportation and to focus on criminals. Since then, the adminstration has deported many fewer non-criminal aliens. But non-criminals remain the vast majority of those deported. And those with no criminal record now actually comprise a slightly larger percentage of those forced to leave the country than they did before Morton’s announcement.

Obama’s broken immigration promise – Salon

The Obama administration claims that it is deporting record numbers of illegal immigrants while focusing on those with criminal records. But new data from Immigration and Customs Enforcement shows that the number of deportation orders has declined dramatically since last summer and non-criminals comprise a growing percentage of those expelled from the country. That wasn’t supposed to happen under a policy of “prosecutorial discretion” announced by ICE director John Morton last June. The goal of the policy, patient announced with much fanfare in the Spanish language media, was to spare “longtime lawful residents” from deportation and to focus on criminals. Since then, the adminstration has deported many fewer non-criminal aliens. But non-criminals remain the vast majority of those deported. And those with no criminal record now actually comprise a slightly larger percentage of those forced to leave the country than they did before Morton’s announcement.

Manchester residents protest immigration program – WMUR

The so-called “Se Communities” program is starting to be rolled out state-by-state. It went into effect in New Hampshire last week without much fanfare. Officials said the program starts when police take fingerprints. Those prints are routinely sent to the FBI. Now the FBI must share those fingerprints with the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division to check for illegal immigrants. While some in the public are unhappy with the idea, many in the government seem at peace with it. The governor’s office said the state routinely shares data with the federal government, and many police departments have said it doesn’t change what they do at all. Demonstrators stood on the steps of the federal building in Manchester to protest the program. “The problem with this is it leads to an increased possibility of racial profiling, an increased possibility that police might pick people up and charge them with something just to get their fingerprints…”

Racial Profiling Bill And Se Communities Intersect in CT

The recently adopted racial profiling legislation that Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is expected to sign may help the state assess the impact of the controversial federal “Se Communities” immigration policy, stuff according to the governor’s top criminal justice adviser. The bill strengthens a law requiring police to report traffic stop data so that it can be analyzed by the state for evidence of racial profiling. But Michael P. Lawlor, the Office of Policy and Management’s head of criminal justice, said that analysis could also uncover misuse of a federal immigration policy. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Se Communities program shares information and fingerprints collected by local police departments with the federal immigration and customs enforcement agency. At a Thursday meeting of an advisory group created to implement the state’s new racial profiling initiative, Lawlor said he has heard concerns that police may be more inclined to fingerprint someone