County adopts resolution ending ICE detainers for non-criminal immigrants | Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Immigrants in Milwaukee who are detained for non-violent offenses will no longer be subject to additional Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) investigations, help following the passage of Resolution 12-224 by the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors. In a victory for the immigrant rights group Voces De La Frontera and its supporters, the county board passed the resolution, championed by 12th District County Supervisor Peggy West, by a vote of 14-4. The resolution directs Milwaukee sheriffs to decline ICE detention requests unless they involve persons who have specific kinds of criminal records (such as felony or non-traffic misdemeanor convictions, for example), are criminal defendants or have outstanding criminal warrants, or are suspected of gang or terrorist activities. Currently, the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) honors all ICE detainer requests. Sheriffs are asked to place a hold of up to 48 hours on an inmate to allow ICE to investigate…

Deportation is a Public Health issue

Lost in an increasingly heated debate about U.S. immigration reform is a growing problem of immigrant mental and emotional health, a public-health says. Tragedies like the Thanksgiving weekend 2011 suicide of high school senior Joaquin Luna Jr., order 18, pharm of Mission, Texas — who said he realized he had “no chance in becoming a civil engineer,” despite excellent grades, because he was undocumented — put an occasional face on immigrant psychosocial challenges. Such incidents energize controversy over the DREAM Act, which would provide a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants who go to college. But unspoken are untold immigrant psychosocial ills, Dr. Manuel Carballo — executive director of the International Center for Migration, Health and Development and a former professor of clinical public health at Columbia University — told United Press International.

LGBTQ Day of Action in Boston Against S-Comm Planned for June 14

Thursday, June 14, health 2012 from 12 – 3 PM, the Hispanic Black Gay Coalition (HBGC), local and state organizations and agencies, and elected officials, as well as advocates and supporters will convene at the Massachusetts State House Grand Staircase for an afternoon of transformative dialogue about three issues that disproportionately impact Black and Hispanic/Latino LGBTQ people — immigration, the criminal justice system, and youth homelessness. Ending the injustices and inequities that make it difficult for LGBTQ people of color to lead safe, healthy and prosperous lives is at the core of HBGC’s programming. In the past, HBGC has hosted and participated  in a number of events that explored and addressed how these issues affect Boston’s Black and Hispanic/Latino LGBTQ communities. With the Day of Action and Awareness, HBGC will bring together a diverse group of community members to discuss current state legislation that could have dire consequences for Massachusetts residents…

Expansión de Comunidades Seguras genera preocupación

La súbita expansión del programa federal Comunidades Seguras a todos los condados de Colorado ha causado preocupación entre los dirigentes proinmigrantes porque la medida deja sin efecto leyes estatales que hasta ahora protegían a personas indocumentadas víctimas de ciertos delitos. Hasta el pasado martes, Comunidades Seguras funcionaba solamente en tres condados de Colorado. Desde ayer, store sin embargo, los departamentos de Policía y oficinas de alguaciles de los 64 condados de este estado podrán y deberán cooperar con las autoridades federales de Inmigración para detectar y arrestar a presuntos indocumentados convictos de crímenes. Aunque la implementación completa de esa colaboración llevará varias semanas, las consecuencias de la expansión de Comunidades Seguras se sentirán inmediatamente, advirtió Alan Kaplan, portavoz de la Coalición de Colorado por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (CIRC, en inglés).

VT Governor Seeking Options to Mitigate S-Comm’s Harm

A federal information-sharing policy newly implemented in Vermont has put the state’s look-the-other-way, order bias-free policing policy in jeopardy. The policy, pharm Se Communities, uses existing procedure and infrastructure to assist the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division in catching illegal immigrants. Before Tuesday, when state or local police in Vermont made an arrest and submitted the suspect’s fingerprints into the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) database, the fingerprint information only went to the FBI database. The fingerprints were checked against known criminals or outstanding warrants, allowing for increased law enforcement capability across state lines. Se Communities is simple: It takes down a previously existing division between the FBI fingerprint database and ICE, thereby allowing immigration officials to track and investigate arrested individuals in Vermont.

Divisive Se Communities measure rolls out in Vt. Tuesday

A top federal law enforcement official confirmed for New England Cable News Monday that the Vermont rollout of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s information-sharing program known as Se Communities will happen Tuesday.  It is already operational in most of the country, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, official told NECN. At the Burlington, Vt. offices of the advocacy group Migrant Justice, Danilo Lopez worried about the measure’s implementation. “Many more people will be deported because of this program,” Lopez predicted. ICE insists Se Communities will be a helpful tool to share fingerprint records between the FBI and Homeland Security, targeting threats to public safety from people who are in this country unlawfully. A fingerprint gathered during an investigation of a minor crime may reveal a more serious history of offenses, the ICE official said.

S-Comm Sparks Protest in Vermont

A federal program aimed at identifying illegal immigrants who are arrested for crimes expanded to Vermont on Tuesday, touching off opposition from advocacy groups for immigrants. Those groups say the Se Communities program was implemented by the federal government in Vermont without consulting state officials, ed and they fear it will help destroy a trust that most of the state’s law enforcement community has worked to build with the immigrant community. The nationwide program, now in 46 states and Puerto Rico, enables police to check the immigration status of suspected illegal immigrants by sharing their fingerprints with the Department of Homeland Security. The group Migrant Justice held a protest outside the Vermont campaign headquarters of President Barack Obama in Burlington on Tuesday afternoon with about 40 people. They started to march shortly before 6 p.m.