A phase-out for 287(g) immigration enforcement partnerships

A part of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s 287(g) enforcement program is coming to an end. It’s become less relevant as the federal government rolls out the broader – and cheaper – Se Communities program around the country. It’s not being scrapped entirely, at least not yet. But there’s a possibility that the agency could phase out more 287(g) contracts with local agencies, including in California, in the months ahead. Last week, in an ICE memo announcing another record year of deportations, the agency also announced that it would not renew any of its agreements with state and local law enforcement agencies operating 287(g) task forces. These are federal-local partnerships under which local cops receive immigration enforcement training from ICE and are authorized to carry out related duties, including immigration status checks. On Dec. 31, 287(g) contracts will expire for 25 local law enforcement agencies around the country. So far, that doesn’t affect any…

A Brighter Line on Immigration and Policing – NYTimes.com

The Obama administration on Friday announced a policy change that — if it works — should lead to smarter enforcement of the immigration laws, s with greater effort spent on deporting dangerous felons and less on minor offenders who pose no threat. The new policy places stricter conditions on when Immigration and Customs Enforcement sends requests, pharm known as detainers, to local law-enforcement agencies asking them to hold suspected immigration violators in jail until the government can pick them up. Detainers will be issued for serious offenders — those who have been convicted or charged with a felony, who have three or more misdemeanor convictions, or have one conviction or charge for misdemeanor crimes like sexual abuse, drunken driving, weapons possession or trafficking. Those who illegally re-entered the country after having been deported or posing a national-security threat would also be detained. But there would be no detainers for those with no convictions or records…

NDLON Reaction to DHS Friday Afternoon Announcement on Se Communities and Deportation Rates

12.21.2012 – Los Angeles, CA

Today, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) announced revisions to the controversial Se Communities deportation program. The National Day Laborer Organizing Network issued the following response:

“There is broad consensus that the criminalization of immigrants driven by ICE has led to a deep, nationwide human rights crisis. The fact that 409,000 families were separated this year should be evidence enough for the need to end programs like Se Communities altogether.” – Pablo Alvarado, Executive Director

Cook County Commissioner Jesus Garcia Stands Up to Federal Immigration Policy

LA County Sheriff Lee Baca earlier this month backed off from his controversial position of complying with a federal government request to turn over for detention arrested individuals suspected of being undocumented immigrants. Baca had initially made his position public in the days before Governor Jerry Brown’s veto of the TRUST Act which would have undermined the federal Se Communities program. But, after California Attorney General Kamala Harris announced in early December that local law enforcement agencies need not comply with Se Communities and that any compliance would be voluntary, sick Baca made the dramatic announcement that he would no longer turn over to federal authorities those individuals arrested for minor offenses who are also suspected undocumented immigrants. Baca was sued in October by the ACLU on behalf of suspected undocumented immigrants who were denied bail after being arrested for minor offenses….

Se Communities policy falling out of favor across the US

As the Obama Administration prepares to tackle immigration reform, a part of its current immigration policy is dividing Democrats across the country. Last year, Democratic governors in Massachusetts, Illinois, and New York pulled out of “Se Communities,” even if Immigration and Customs Enforcement — or ICE — insists the program is not optional.  Governor Jerry Brown has not come out against the program but much of the rest of the state would rather not comply. Reporter Amy Isackson explains

Supporters of TRUST Act meet with Governor Brown’s staff for first time

Last September, s Governor Brown vetoed an earlier version of the TRUST Act. At the time he said that the bill was flawed and that it could potentially release immigrants with criminal backgrounds back to the streets.   Since then, Brown has met with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials (ICE), with the State Sheriff’s Association, and now, with immigration activists. There is growing consensus about the need to find a compromise on California’s enforcement of federal immigration laws. State Attorney General Kamala Harris, for example, recently advised local law enforcement agencies to use discretion before they turn over low-level criminals over to ICE. Chris Newman, legal director for the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, says he has hope for the governor’s support of the TRUST Act this time around.   “California has the opportunity to do something that is clearly within its legal authority that will also help propel the federal immigration reform debate…