Job Center Helps Immigrant Workers As They Await Reform | The Brooklyn Ink

When Victoriano de la Cruz hustled for construction work on Brooklyn’s streets, check he earned $60 a day. But since joining the Bay Parkway Community Job Center in Bensonhurst, he’s picked up skills and commands a wage of up to triple that amount, enough to build a new home in his native Mexico. De la Cruz, 35, was one of a half-dozen immigrant day laborers at the job center on Monday. The red-and-yellow trailer on the edge of Gravesend Bay is run by the Workers’ Justice Project, a group advocating equal pay and rights for immigrant and low-wage workers. Its denizens are grateful for the structure and organization the center provides, but see nationwide legal action as key to foreign workers’ prosperity. “I think it’s very important,” de la Cruz said. “Immigration reform could help guarantee a fair wage for immigrant workers, and make sure they work in safe conditions.”

El Patrón Es El Ladrón! – Jose Ucelo Fights his Deportation

Like many struggling workers, Mr. José Ucelo Gonzalez looks for work every day at the Home Depot by Brookhurst Ave. and the interstate 5 fwy in Anaheim. On March 9th, 2012, Mr. Ucelo accepted a job offer by Michael Tebb; owner of M.T Asphalt, an Anaheim based company. The agreement was $10 an hour. After a hard 10-hour day work, Mr. Ucelo tried to collect his salary, but instead he got verbally abused and challenged to a fistfight by his employer. Mr. Ucelo remained calm and tried to deescalate the situation, but the harassment continued. Tebb accused his employee of robbery and threatened to call the police if he insisted on asking for his pay. The contractor got in his truck and left. Mr. Ucelo called 911 to ask for assistance but before he could give his location to the operator,

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5 Questions for John Morton and an Agency Gone Rogue

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As the momentum for meaningful immigration reform continues to build, one person who stands out as moving in the opposite direction is ICE Director John Morton.  

His record as director and as the person who has overseen the expansion of immigration enforcement and the resulting record deportations during the Obama Presidency has prompted organizations to call for his firing and has created a credibility issue for the administration.

As Morton is called to testify in front of Congress, below are five questions we would like to see asked. 

 

Beware of police brutality against immigrants – Miami Herald

By involving city law-enforcement agents in an effort to eradicate illegal immigration, the U.S. government has also created a public safety problem, especially in immigrant communities like ours. Undocumented immigrants, who are no less worthy than the rest of human beings for not having proper papers, do not call the police, even when they are victims or witnesses of crimes, for fear of being deported and separated from their families. The controversial immigration enforcement program, Se Communities, considered an invaluable tool in ferreting out dangerous foreign criminals, also grants carte blanche to criminals and some in authority to commit abuse against a segment of our community. Furthermore, it endangers any American who may be a victim of a crime witnessed by an undocumented person who fears reporting it.