Calif. gov. OKs driver licenses for illegal immigrants, rejects ‘anti-Arizona’ legislation – The Washington Post

Meanwhile, Brown vetoed AB1081, which could have protected illegal immigrants from deportation if they committed minor infractions. The bill has been dubbed “anti-Arizona” legislation, a reference to that state’s immigrant identification law. The so-called Trust Act would have let California opt out of some parts of a federal program that requires local law enforcement officers to check the fingerprints of people they arrest against a federal immigration database and hold those who are in the country illegally. It would have barred local law enforcement officers from detaining suspects for possible deportation unless they are charged with serious or violent felonies.

Brown misses opportunity with TRUST Act

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new law that will allow hundreds of thousands of young illegal immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses and vetoed another that would have restricted sheriffs from helping federal authorities detain undocumented Californians for potential deportation. His actions, announced Sunday as the deadline neared to finish work on nearly 1,000 bills sent to him by the Legislature this year, followed an intense week of protests, prayer vigils and lobbying by immigrant advocacy groups. The governor also revived a tax break for Hollywood, allowed juvenile killers serving life in prison a chance for release and outlawed intended to turn gay children straight. The laws take effect Jan. 1. The immigration bills sparked the most controversy.

No one Can Veto a Movement

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Years of work to see the TRUST Act passed does not stop because Governor Brown chose to veto the bill.         

He can veto a bill but he cannot veto a movement.  Never has California been so united behind something that reflects the most basic of what we deserve.  For parents and children to know that when we leave our house in the morning we will be reunited without chance that interactions with police will tear us away from our loved ones.

We have galvanized understanding of a problem whose solution is now inevitable: We believe that our families belong together.  It is police and ICE that should be separated.

TRUST Act Endorsements

The Sacramento BeeEnd ICE’s hold on law enforcement agenciesApril 13, 2012By Julia Harumi Mass By giving officers an incentive to arrest “foreign-looking” individuals for minor infractions or no reason at all, S-Comm undermines the Constitution’s guarantees of due process and equal protection and encourages racial profiling. La OpinionCalifornia No Es Arizonapor Hector Villagra y Pablo…

Ariz. immigrants taught to cope with new law – CBS News

Critics of Arizona’s controversial immigration law are on alert. This week, a federal judge gave the state the go-ahead to enforce the “show me your papers” provision of the law. Now some undocumented immigrants are being taught how to respond. As night falls on a Mesa, Arizona park, worried families, many of them undocumented immigrants, are instructed on what to say if questioned by police. Instructor: “You want a lawyer?” Woman: “Yes.” Civil rights groups are also teaching people how to use cell phones to record video if stopped by the police. The training session was a response to Arizona’s law that took effect this week. It allows police to investigate the immigration status of anyone they stop, giving rise to fears of racial profiling. Defenders of the law say police will not use race when deciding whom to question about immigration status.

SB1070: Pushing the Gears of History Forward

 

clinic Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left;”>The migrant rights movement in this country is about to enter a new phase and every person, no matter their position, will have to decide how they will relate to it.

While many are waiting to see the decision of the Supreme Court related to the Department of Justice’s SB1070 case, a human rights crisis of epic proportions is already roiling in Arizona.

The status quo we face now and the results of even the best possible decision from the Supreme Court still represent a steady march toward anti-immigrant attrition that the state has constructed over years.  First we faced efforts to restrict our ability to function in society: drivers’ license bans, denial of social services, and English only rules. Then they built ways to humiliate and dehumanize us through Sheriff Arpaio’s outdoor jails and Florence’s expanding penal colonies.