Roy v Los Angeles County

On October 19, 2012, NDLON and other organizations sued Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca for engaging in massive unconstitutional detention of immigrants and U.S. citizens suspected of being immigrants in Los Angeles County jails. The lawsuit alleges that detaining people in County Jails on the basis of voluntary ICE holds is unlawful. Sheriff Baca…

Los Angeles County sheriff’s office sued over immigration holds

Rights groups filed a class-action lawsuit on Friday against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, accusing it of unlawfully detaining immigrants at the behest of the federal government for days beyond when they should have been released. The suit highlights the detention of a British filmmaker and legal immigrant, Duncan Roy, who spent 89 days in jail because of an erroneous federal immigration hold that left him unable to post bail, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. The lawsuit is the latest effort by rights groups to turn California into a so-called sanctuary state that protects unauthorized immigrants. That is in stark contrast to states such as Arizona that are engaged in crackdowns on illegal immigration which have sparked fears of racial profiling. An immigration hold is a request by the federal government that they would like someone to remain in custody so they can seek deportation.

ICE Inmates in California Claim They Were Denied Bail

Tens of thousands of inmates who should have been eligible for release from sheriff’s custody allegedly remain detained for days or even months because of immigration-related holds. Such is the claim made by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Southern California, which is now filing a federal lawsuit against Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca. The ACLU said it will file the federal lawsuit Friday challenging Sheriff Baca’s ability to detain arrestees solely on the basis of an immigration hold when they are eligible for bail or other forms of release. Plaintiff Duncan Roy — a British film director — said he was held in jail for nearly three months because of a hold filed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, even though he tried multiple times to post bail. “The sheriff says, he’s on an ICE hold, and the ICE people say, well, he’s got to make bond,”

Lawsuit: ACLU, NDLON, British director Duncan Roy to accuse LA County Sheriff of illegally detaining him

A British man says he was detained unlawfully for 89 days in Men’s Central Jail in Downtown Los Angeles on an immigration hold that should have never been in place. Duncan Roy, a Malibu filmmaker, says he repeatedly tried to bail out of jail after an arrest for suspicion of misdemeanor extortion. But the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department wouldn’t let him post bail for almost three months because immigration authorities had asked the department to hold him while they investigated his immigration status.  Roy was in the country legally.

The Jobs Numbers: Never Mind the Quantity, Check the Quality

The jobs numbers: never mind the quantity, check the quality

Behind modest jobs growth, the real story is full-time jobs with good benefits are still disappearing. America’s going part-time. 

guardian.co.uk,

It’s heartening to see Friday’s news that the unemployment rate edged down to 7.8% last month. But let’s not get too caught up in celebrations. We need to look beyond the sheer quantity of jobs being created and into the quality of those jobs – something neither presidential candidate seems very interested in talking about.

Buried in the Friday’s jobs report is evidence that a disturbing trend continues: the creation of more part-time jobs, many of them low-wage, taking the place of solid middle-class careers. Positions in sectors like manufacturing continued to decline last month, replaced by new jobs in the healthcare, warehousing and retail industries. A lot of these jobs don’t allow workers to rack up enough hours to earn healthcare benefits – let alone break out of poverty.

Mistrust in California – NYTimes.com

Gov. Jerry Brown of California dropped the ball on Sunday when he vetoed the Trust Act, a bill aimed at keeping harmless immigrants out of the deportation dragnet — not out of misguided compassion, order but to bolster public safety. The police in immigrant communities depend on the cooperation of witnesses and victims; when local officers become federal immigration deputies, fear overrides trust and crime festers. Mr. Brown’s late-night veto bitterly disappointed immigrant advocates, law-enforcement officials, religious leaders and others who had urged him to take a stand against pressure from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which is deporting people at a blistering pace and wants to keep doing so. The agency’s Se Communities program has turned local police into handmaidens of federal immigration policy; people arrested are automatically subjected to immigration checks, leading to the deportations of tens of thousands who have no criminal records or are only minor offenders.

Jerry Brown disappoints – laopinion.com

Governor Jerry Brown’s veto of the TRUST Act means political considerations triumphed over protecting California’s immigrant community from the arbitrary enforcement of federal law. The enactment of the state law would have probably led to a confrontation in court with the Justice Department, since it established state regulation of a federal program, Se Communities. The governor apparently did not understand that this was a fair battle, one worth fighting. From the beginning, the federal program-intended to detain and deport dangerous undocumented immigrants-was disorganized and confusing about aspects of its implementation and rules establishing the duties and responsibilities of cities, counties and states. The situation worsened when some law enforcement agencies interpreted the program strictly, contradicting the idea of focusing on the most dangerous individuals, and wasted time and resources on irrelevant cases.