SB1070: Pushing the Gears of History Forward

 

clinic Helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: left;”>The migrant rights movement in this country is about to enter a new phase and every person, no matter their position, will have to decide how they will relate to it.

While many are waiting to see the decision of the Supreme Court related to the Department of Justice’s SB1070 case, a human rights crisis of epic proportions is already roiling in Arizona.

The status quo we face now and the results of even the best possible decision from the Supreme Court still represent a steady march toward anti-immigrant attrition that the state has constructed over years.  First we faced efforts to restrict our ability to function in society: drivers’ license bans, denial of social services, and English only rules. Then they built ways to humiliate and dehumanize us through Sheriff Arpaio’s outdoor jails and Florence’s expanding penal colonies.

Defending Arizona in a SB 1070 Nation: What Side Are You On? – Jeff Biggers

With defiant Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer growing moreemboldened as the Supreme Court readies to unveil its ruling on the state’s SB 1070 “papers, please” immigration law, Arizona human rights group Puenteand their national allies are bolstering their “Barrio Defense Committees,” as “neighbors link with neighbors to learn their rights and make collective plans to defend themselves.”

They are also asking their fellow Arizona neighbors and politicians to take a stand.

After record deportations, Obama’s welcome change of immigration policy

Cynicism at Obama’s election-year move aside, what gives me hope for real reform is the energy of the migrant rights campaign

Latino youth protesting Obama administration immigration policy

Myisha Areloano, Adrian James, Jahel Campos, David Vuenrostro and Antonio Cabrera camp outside of the Obama campaign headquarters in Culver City, California to protest of the administration’s immigration policies: on Friday 15 June, the president announced a change of policy. Photograph: Grant Hindsley/AP

In a major announcement Friday 15 June, the Obama administration declared it will stop deporting eligible undocumented youth and grant them work permits. I was immediately elated to hear the news that could change the lives of family members, friends, and thousands of young people who face the threat of deportation every day. Yet, as the initial shock wears off, I can’t ignore a rising sense of skepticism in response to the president’s nakedly political move in an election year. Nor can I ignore his record so far.

Securing DC’s Community – Washington Post

Ever since the Department of Homeland Security decided to conscript local police as “force multipliers” in harsh immigration enforcement efforts, sick cities and states have found themselves unwittingly or unwillingly part of the controversial federal deportation program misnamed Se Communities. But a bold move last week by the D.C. Council [“In D.C., no warm welcome for immigration crackdown,” Metro, June 5] to protect residents from the effects of Se Communities should serve as a model for the country.

Día del inmigrante

Spanish below English. Immigrants Day Hello to all the users of this blog. To mark Immigrants Day I want to talk about what happened in Sacramento, where people and leaders from various organizations met to present legislative proposals that support the immigrants of California and their families. A fellow worker and I are from San…

e-verify 2.0: The New “IMAGE” Program

A new federal program called IMAGE (ICE Mutual Agreement between Government and Employers) was just adopted by the city of Escondido in California. Through IMAGE, the employer agrees to use e-verify and also submit to regular audits of its employee information. Of course, case this will only have the same impact as e-verify – facilitating worker exploitation by pushing workers underground. See more here: Escondido: City becomes first in county to volunteer for immigration audit

From a Brooklyn Street Corner, a Women’s Cleaning Cooperative Grows

From a Brooklyn Street Corner, s a Women’s Cleaning Cooperative Grows

 

New York Times Article By NADIA SUSSMAN

After years of waiting on a Brooklyn street corner trying to land jobs cleaning houses, cheap Teresa Bucio decided there had to be a better way to earn a living.

Like dozens of Latina immigrants, Ms. Bucio, 33, used to stand at the corner of Division and Marcy Avenues in Williamsburg every morning, hoping to be hired.

The intersection — a bare cement triangle overlooking a sunken stretch of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway — is an unusual all-women day labor site where residents of the heavily Hasidic neighborhood find people to clean their homes. Ligia Guallpa, an advocate for day laborers who has assisted women at the site for years, estimated that some 200 women congregated there over any given week, and many of them are illegal immigrants.

Unnecessary Roadblocks Prompt Fayetteville Community Meeting with Fairburn Police Chief

The Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights calls to end roadblocks associated with racial profiling in immigrant communities. 

What: Press Conference Before Meeting with Fairburn Police Department 
When: Monday, May 14th 1:00 pm 
Where: 191 South West Broad St. Fairburn, Ga. 30213 
Who: CPG, Fayetteville Community and the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights (GLAHR) 

Recent activation of 287(g) agreements, Se Communities, and HB87, that merge local police with complex federal immigration authorities has led to an increase in racial profiling and discrimination in law enforcement practices. 

In Fayetteville, community members will be meeting with Fairburn Police Chief James McCarthy on Monday the 14th to call for an end to roadblocks they describe as focal points of discrimination.