Arizona SCOTUS Ruling Frames NY “Se Communities” Debate

NEW YORK – Just one day after the U.S. Supreme Court’s split decision on Arizona’s controversial immigration law, a new education campaign is being launched today to deal with local fears surrounding enforcement on Long Island of federal immigration rules, particularly the Se Communities immigration program, known as S-com. Ted Hesson, online editor for Long Island Wins, says that for now the portion of the Supreme Court ruling that upholds the “show me your papers law” applies to Arizona police, but his group is concerned because there have been plenty of copycat laws around the nation. “Whereas S-com is sort of de facto authorizing police to act as immigration agents on the local level, this is actually requiring the police who are out there to be doing this as part of their job.” The Supreme Court ruled that the remaining three provisions of Arizona’s immigration law violate the Constitution.

Is your home state being Arizonified? – UU World

A major reason for holding a Justice GA in Arizona has always been so that participants could learn how to take lessons home to confront anti-immigrant measures wherever they live. Sarahi Uribe At an education session Thursday titled “Confronting Arizonification in Our Own Backyard” Sarahi Uribe, Angie Junck, and the Rev. Craig Roshaven shared strategies for doing just that. Uribe is with the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, Junck with the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, and Roshaven is director of the UUA’s Witness Ministries staff group. Roshaven noted the UUA is developing a campaign to challenge the federal government’s Se Communities program, which deports many people including some who are arrested for minor law violations.

SB 1070 Ruling Refocuses Attention on Se Communities and ICE

Monday’s Supreme Court decision that allowed a portion of SB 1070 (Section 2B) to stand included the measure empowering the state to require local law enforcement to check the immigration status of suspects who are detained. If an officer stops someone for a non-immigration related reason and suspects that the person may be undocumented, story Arizona law enforcement agents have to determine the immigration status of the person being held. Immigration advocates have argued that this particular provision of SB 1070 has a similar effect to the Obama administration’s Se Communities program, there which deputizes local law enforcement to act in an immigration capacity. And because of the continued expansion of the Se Communities (S-Comm) and notice that participation in federal program is mandatory, the lines between the Arizona law and the Obama policy have become blurred.

Groups Seek TN Supreme Court Block Of 287(g) Program

Several groups have issued a challenge to the Tennessee Supreme Court, asking them to block the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office ability to deport immigrants who are in the country illegally. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIPNLG), and the Law Offices of Elliott Ozment, joined by local attorneys from the firm of Sherrard & Roe issued the request Thursday. The 287-G program allows Davidson County sheriff’s deputies to identify, process and detain illegal immigrants who have been arrested for other offenses. But immigration attorney Elliott Ozment argues the sheriff’s office can’t enter into that agreement, because the agency gave up law enforcement powers in 1963. Ozment filed a lawsuit in January 2011 saying the 287(g) in Nashville violates state and local laws. “This agreement is illegal and enforcing it simply adds insult to injury for the Nashville community,” said Tom Fritzsche, staff attorney for the SPLC.

Students Press for Action on Immigration – NYTimes.com

Young illegal immigrants, saying President Obama has done little to diminish the threat of deportations they face despite repeated promises, have started a campaign to press him to use executive powers to allow them to remain legally in the country. The campaign is led by the United We Dream Network, the largest organization of young immigrants here illegally who would be eligible for legal status under a proposal in Congress known as the Dream Act. The young people are among the most visible activists in a growing immigrant movement. Their push to focus pressure on the White House reflects deep frustration with Congress for its lack of action on the legislation and with the administration for continuing to deport illegal immigrant students, although Mr. Obama says he supports them.

Expansión de Comunidades Seguras genera preocupación – Univision Noticias

La súbita expansión del programa federal Comunidades Seguras a todos los condados de Colorado ha causado preocupación entre los dirigentes pro inmigrantes, porque la medida deja sin efecto leyes estatales que hasta ahora protegían a personas indocumentadas víctimas de ciertos delitos. Hasta el pasado martes, mind Comunidades Seguras funcionaba solamente en tres condados de Colorado. Desde el miércoles, sin embargo, los departamentos de Policía y oficinas de alguaciles de los 64 condados de este estado podrán y deberán cooperar con las autoridades federales de Inmigración para detectar y arrestar a presuntos indocumentados convictos de crímenes. Aunque la implementación completa de esa colaboración llevará varias semanas, las consecuencias de la expansión de Comunidades Seguras se sentirán inmediatamente, advirtió Alan Kaplan, portavoz de la Coalición de Colorado por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (CIRC).

Breaking Down The Border

With policies like 287g coming to Knox County the focus has been on illegal immigration. But what is it really like to live hidden in broad daylight among the 12 million undocumented people living in America? “I’m a Christian, I’m a Catholic, so I always pray and say ‘well I hope today is good just let me come back.'” We first heard about Jose at an immigrant rights rally in downtown Knoxville. While that’s not his real name, this is his real story and it’s not uncommon. “Crossing the border is not easy.” Jose told us at our station. “Soon as you’re here still you’re risking to be deported, to be a criminal, but that’s the way I came. That’s the way a lot of people come, crossing the border, risking their life.” Jose left his town in Mexico and walked into San Diego in 1992. It took a bus, a race across the desert and a bike.