Defending Arizona in a SB 1070 Nation: What Side Are You On? – Jeff Biggers

With defiant Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer growing moreemboldened as the Supreme Court readies to unveil its ruling on the state’s SB 1070 “papers, please” immigration law, Arizona human rights group Puenteand their national allies are bolstering their “Barrio Defense Committees,” as “neighbors link with neighbors to learn their rights and make collective plans to defend themselves.”

They are also asking their fellow Arizona neighbors and politicians to take a stand.

Community members rally against 287(g) – The Tennessean

More than 100 people marched up Seventh Avenue Thursday, their voices booming, as they chanted in English and Spanish, “What do we want? Justice. When do we want it? Now.” They walked from the Downtown Presbyterian Church to the Tennessee Supreme Court building to demonstrate their outrage against Metro’s participation in the 287(g) program – the federal immigration enforcement program that allows law enforcement to determine the immigration status of jail inmates and turn them over for federal deportation proceedings. The march occurred just hours before the Tennessee Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case challenging the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office’s authority to participate in the federal program. Protesters argue the Metro charter gives policing authority to the Metro Police Department, not the sheriff’s department. Speakers at the rally included leaders of state and national immigrant advocacy groups and legal representatives. They condemned 287(g) for the fear…

Groups Seek TN Supreme Court Block Of 287(g) Program

Several groups have issued a challenge to the Tennessee Supreme Court, asking them to block the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office ability to deport immigrants who are in the country illegally. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIPNLG), and the Law Offices of Elliott Ozment, joined by local attorneys from the firm of Sherrard & Roe issued the request Thursday. The 287-G program allows Davidson County sheriff’s deputies to identify, process and detain illegal immigrants who have been arrested for other offenses. But immigration attorney Elliott Ozment argues the sheriff’s office can’t enter into that agreement, because the agency gave up law enforcement powers in 1963. Ozment filed a lawsuit in January 2011 saying the 287(g) in Nashville violates state and local laws. “This agreement is illegal and enforcing it simply adds insult to injury for the Nashville community,” said Tom Fritzsche, staff attorney for the SPLC.

After record deportations, Obama’s welcome change of immigration policy

Cynicism at Obama’s election-year move aside, what gives me hope for real reform is the energy of the migrant rights campaign

Latino youth protesting Obama administration immigration policy

Myisha Areloano, Adrian James, Jahel Campos, David Vuenrostro and Antonio Cabrera camp outside of the Obama campaign headquarters in Culver City, California to protest of the administration’s immigration policies: on Friday 15 June, the president announced a change of policy. Photograph: Grant Hindsley/AP

In a major announcement Friday 15 June, the Obama administration declared it will stop deporting eligible undocumented youth and grant them work permits. I was immediately elated to hear the news that could change the lives of family members, friends, and thousands of young people who face the threat of deportation every day. Yet, as the initial shock wears off, I can’t ignore a rising sense of skepticism in response to the president’s nakedly political move in an election year. Nor can I ignore his record so far.