‘Independence Day’ rings hollow for Philly’s undocumented immigrants Metro.us

Americans traditionally treat Independence Day as an observance of the country’s hard-won freedom and liberties. But some activists say for undocumented immigrants in the U.S., s there’s nothing to celebrate this Fourth of July. “There’s a huge number of families who are not at liberty,” said Blanca Pacheco, an organizer with interfaith immigrants ri…

‘Independence Day’ rings hollow for Philly’s undocumented immigrants Metro.us

Americans traditionally treat Independence Day as an observance of the country’s hard-won freedom and liberties. But some activists say for undocumented immigrants in the U.S., sick there’s nothing to celebrate this Fourth of July. “There’s a huge number of families who are not at liberty,” said Blanca Pacheco, an organizer with interfaith immigrants ri…

‘Independence Day’ rings hollow for Philly’s undocumented immigrants Metro.us

Americans traditionally treat Independence Day as an observance of the country’s hard-won freedom and liberties. But some activists say for undocumented immigrants in the U.S., there’s nothing to celebrate this Fourth of July. “There’s a huge number of families who are not at liberty,” said Blanca Pacheco, an organizer with interfaith immigrants ri…

‘Independence Day’ rings hollow for Philly’s undocumented immigrants Metro.us

Americans traditionally treat Independence Day as an observance of the country’s hard-won freedom and liberties. But some activists say for undocumented immigrants in the U.S., there’s nothing to celebrate this Fourth of July. “There’s a huge number of families who are not at liberty,” said Blanca Pacheco, an organizer with interfaith immigrants ri…

‘Independence Day’ rings hollow for Philly’s undocumented immigrants Metro.us

Americans traditionally treat Independence Day as an observance of the country’s hard-won freedom and liberties. But some activists say for undocumented immigrants in the U.S., there’s nothing to celebrate this Fourth of July. “There’s a huge number of families who are not at liberty,” said Blanca Pacheco, an organizer with interfaith immigrants ri…

Courthouse News Service

Five government agencies will pay $1.2 million in legal fees after having to disclose documents on a controversial fingerprinting and deportation program, s a rights group says.      In April 2010, the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) and others sued the FBI, the Executive Office for Immigration Review and the Office of Legal Counsel and two other agencies seeking information about Se Communities, or S-Comm.      The plaintiffs, which include the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and the Immigration Justice Clinic of the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, said the "error-prone" system would be instituted nationwide "without sufficient transparency, oversight, or public engagement." Ostensibly developed to target criminals, the system was allegedly flush with immigrants whom authorities fingerprinted for minor traffic offenses to meet deportation quotas.      The groups sought the information as ammunition for a campaign urging supporters to "End Se Communiti..