Expansión de Comunidades Seguras genera preocupación

La súbita expansión del programa federal Comunidades Seguras a todos los condados de Colorado ha causado preocupación entre los dirigentes proinmigrantes porque la medida deja sin efecto leyes estatales que hasta ahora protegían a personas indocumentadas víctimas de ciertos delitos. Hasta el pasado martes, Comunidades Seguras funcionaba solamente en tres condados de Colorado. Desde ayer, store sin embargo, los departamentos de Policía y oficinas de alguaciles de los 64 condados de este estado podrán y deberán cooperar con las autoridades federales de Inmigración para detectar y arrestar a presuntos indocumentados convictos de crímenes. Aunque la implementación completa de esa colaboración llevará varias semanas, las consecuencias de la expansión de Comunidades Seguras se sentirán inmediatamente, advirtió Alan Kaplan, portavoz de la Coalición de Colorado por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (CIRC, en inglés).

VT Governor Seeking Options to Mitigate S-Comm’s Harm

A federal information-sharing policy newly implemented in Vermont has put the state’s look-the-other-way, order bias-free policing policy in jeopardy. The policy, pharm Se Communities, uses existing procedure and infrastructure to assist the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division in catching illegal immigrants. Before Tuesday, when state or local police in Vermont made an arrest and submitted the suspect’s fingerprints into the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) database, the fingerprint information only went to the FBI database. The fingerprints were checked against known criminals or outstanding warrants, allowing for increased law enforcement capability across state lines. Se Communities is simple: It takes down a previously existing division between the FBI fingerprint database and ICE, thereby allowing immigration officials to track and investigate arrested individuals in Vermont.

Divisive Se Communities measure rolls out in Vt. Tuesday

A top federal law enforcement official confirmed for New England Cable News Monday that the Vermont rollout of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s information-sharing program known as Se Communities will happen Tuesday.  It is already operational in most of the country, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, official told NECN. At the Burlington, Vt. offices of the advocacy group Migrant Justice, Danilo Lopez worried about the measure’s implementation. “Many more people will be deported because of this program,” Lopez predicted. ICE insists Se Communities will be a helpful tool to share fingerprint records between the FBI and Homeland Security, targeting threats to public safety from people who are in this country unlawfully. A fingerprint gathered during an investigation of a minor crime may reveal a more serious history of offenses, the ICE official said.

S-Comm Sparks Protest in Vermont

A federal program aimed at identifying illegal immigrants who are arrested for crimes expanded to Vermont on Tuesday, touching off opposition from advocacy groups for immigrants. Those groups say the Se Communities program was implemented by the federal government in Vermont without consulting state officials, ed and they fear it will help destroy a trust that most of the state’s law enforcement community has worked to build with the immigrant community. The nationwide program, now in 46 states and Puerto Rico, enables police to check the immigration status of suspected illegal immigrants by sharing their fingerprints with the Department of Homeland Security. The group Migrant Justice held a protest outside the Vermont campaign headquarters of President Barack Obama in Burlington on Tuesday afternoon with about 40 people. They started to march shortly before 6 p.m.

Amherst passes law in opposition to Se Communities – WWLP.com

With a nearly unanimous vote at Monday’s town meeting, the Town of Amherst decided to opt out of the controversial Se Communities Program. Se Communities is a program designed by the Department of Homeland Security to crack down on illegal immigrants who commit crimes, as well as those who continually violate immigration laws. By passing Article 29, Amherst residents chose not to participate. Through the resolution, community members said that they wanted to make sure local law enforcement agencies could not stop anyone randomly just to check their immigration status. Amherst’s resolution specifically states, “Municipal employees of the Town of Amherst, including law enforcement employees, shall not monitor, stop, detain, question, interrogate or search a person for the purpose of determining that individual’s immigration status.”

California TRUST Act with Amendments

Existing federal law authorizes any authorized immigration officer to issue an immigration detainer that serves to advise another law enforcement agency that the federal department seeks custody of an alien presently in the custody of that agency, for the purpose of arresting and removing the alien. Existing federal law provides that the detainer is a request that the agency advise the department, prior to release of the alien, in order for the department to arrange to assume custody, in situations when gaining immediate physical custody is either impracticable or impossible.
This bill would prohibit a law enforcement official, as defined, from detaining an individual on the basis of a United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold after that individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody, unless the local agency adopts a plan that meets certain requirements prior to or after compliance with the immigration hold, and, at the time that the individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody, certain conditions are met.

‘TRUST Act 2.0′: Amended CA bill would only let cops hold convicted criminals for ICE | Multi-American

A year ago, order a bill was moving through the California state legislature that aimed to make optional counties and cities’ participation in the controversial Se Communities immigration enforcement program. At the time, California was one of several states in which some state and law enforcement officials had come out against the federal program, store which allows the fingerprints of people booked at local jails to be shared with immigration officials. The bill was rendered moot last August, after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement rescinded state agreements with the agency allowing Se Communities to operate. The decision essentially made the program mandatory, leaving states no choice but to go along. As a counter to that, the same California lawmaker behind last year’s bill is now pushing an alternative dubbed TRUST Act 2.0.

Vista, CA Father’s Death in AZ Desert Shows Need for TRUST Act

A Vista man died along the U.S. border with Mexico last month trying to return to his family after being deported. The body of Alfonso Martinez Sanchez, 39, was found on the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, his family and authorities said. The reservation stretches along the Arizona border and is a frequent route for thousands of migrants attempting to cross the border illegally. It is an unforgiving environment, part of the Sonoran desert, where temperatures can often soar to more than 100 degrees. Martinez was trying to return to his wife and five U.S.-born children, ages 5 to 18, said Juana Garcia Martinez, his wife. Martinez was the main bread winner and now the family is struggling to make ends meet, she said. “He knew that we needed him,” Garcia said. “He wanted to be here.”

Immigrants Lobby for TRUST Act in Sacramento

A morning rally is planned before the various groups fan out to talk with legislators. The rally, which will take place at the capitol building will include greetings and speeches from Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-SF and Sen. Kevin De Leon, D-LA. Dilkhwaz Ahmed traveled to Sacramento on Sunday to get a head start on the activities. She is executive director of El Cajon-based License to Freedom, which provides support services to refugee and immigrant survivors of domestic abuse. She is prepared to share client stories with decision makers who will consider AB 1081, a bill dubbed “TRUST Act,” which would allow communities to opt out of the federal immigration “Se Communities” program until county officials choose to rejoin under amended agreements that would provide protection for some immigrants including those who are victims of domestic violence. The program, currently in place in every country across the state, scans fingerprints to check for legal status and generally allows..