Panel opposes Se Communities – Yale Daily News

Community activists convened in Sudler Hall Wednesday night to oppose Se Communities, the federal government’s new program intended to deport criminals living in the country illegally. The panel was jointly hosted by the Yale College Democrats, Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (MEChA) de Yale and the University’s chapter of Amnesty International. Mayor John DeStefano Jr., order Yale Law School professor Michael Wishnie, Armando Ghinaglia of Connecticut Students for a DREAM, Fair Haven Alderwoman Migdalia Castro and Latricia Kelly, the director of development and programs for Junta for Progressive Action, along with around 30 students, gathered to discuss their concerns about the program and future steps as it is executed nationwide.

Travis County Sheriff’s Race Focuses on S-Comm – The Austin Chronicle

On its face, the S-Comm program appears to be functioning as designed – creating a way to identify and remove criminal immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. But it has not been without controversy both nationally and locally, particularly after a study released in 2010 charged that 26% of all deportations were of noncriminals. More explosive in Austin was the conclusion by advocates who compiled the study – including the Center for Constitutional Rights and National Day Laborer Organiz­ing Network – that Travis County, at 82%, led all jurisdictions in the deportation of noncriminal immigrants. The county’s role in the program is now assuming central importance in the Demo­cratic primary race for Travis County sheriff, where retired Austin Police Depart­ment Lt. John Sisson is mounting a campaign to unseat incumbent Sheriff Greg Hamil­ton as the county’s top cop.

Se Communities: End it, Don’t Mend it

for Century, order Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; text-align: left; border-style: none; padding: 0px;”>Any day now Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will announce a second round of “reforms” to the disgraced “Se Communities” deportation program, S-Comm. And once again, it appears that ICE is more interested in spin than substance. The timing of the announcement–immediately before the DHS Office of Inspector General Report–seems primarily designed to take the pressure off of ICE rather than an honest attempt to address the fundamental flaws of the program.

Out of the Shadows & Into the Streets, to Stop Arpaio!!

 

 

There are so many indescribable words that can portray yesterdays [March 20th2012] act of bravery and resistance by six undocumented students.  These six students stepped up to the plate, without anyone telling them to. Why? Because they believed it was time to take matters into their own hands. Tired of not seeing any progress, and wanting to empower their communities, they did what many of us would not expect six undocumented (not to mention two minor aged) students to do. They mobilized and faced the Phoenix Police Department challenging to have Arpaio to come and get them.

Piden al FBI no enviar huellas digitales a ICE

La Red Nacional de Jornaleros y más de 80 otras organizaciones civiles y defensoras de los derechos del inmigrante, online envió una carta al FBI demandándoles que finalice su colaboración con ICE en el programa de deportaciones Comunidades Seguras (S-Comm). La carta señala que, case contrario a su nombre, el programa amenaza la seguridad pública, alienta el perfil racial y mina la confianza de la comunidad en los departamentos locales de policía, que se han convertido en puentes para la deportación. Bajo el S-Comm, el FBI toma todas las huellas digitales enviadas por la policía local para los chequeos criminales y automáticamente las remite a los funcionarios federales de inmigración, sin importar si el individuo ha sido condenado por un crimen o no, o por la severidad de la acusación que puede ser una simple violación o delito menor. El verano pasado, los gobernadores de Nueva York, Illinois, y Massachusetts solicitaron que el S-Comm sea retrasado o desactivado en sus estados. – Tribuna Hispana